Sunday, May 15, 2005

renowned biblical scholar, bp. spong, has a new book

From Nicholas Kristof's editorial in the Times today:

It's entirely possible to honor Christian conservatives for their first-rate humanitarian work treating the sick in Africa or fighting sex trafficking in Asia, and still do battle with them over issues like gay rights.

Liberals can and should confront Bible-thumping preachers on their own terms, for the scriptural emphasis on justice and compassion gives the left plenty of ammunition. After all, the Bible depicts Jesus as healing lepers, not slashing Medicaid.


The gadfly of all things good, Jack Spong, has a new book out. Kristof's editorial is sort of a review of it.

Bp. Spong has figured out that Judas didn't betray Jesus, that St. Paul was "a self-hating gay", and that Jesus was "probably married to Mary Magdalene".

Spong's book is very valuable according to Kristof:

This book is long overdue, because one of the biggest mistakes liberals have made has been to forfeit battles in which faith plays a crucial role. Religion has always been a central current of American life, and it is becoming more important in politics because of the new Great Awakening unfolding across the United States.

3 comments:

Philip said...

I hope Spong properly cited Dan Brown in his bibliography.

Joseph said...

Spong has a new book out? Or is it just the same old book rewritten yet again? I haven't heard him say anything new for years.

The young fogey said...

It's entirely possible to honour Christian liberals for their first-rate humanitarian work or opposing the war in Iraq and still do battle with them over issues like the apostolic ministry or the Real Presence.

Catholics can and should confront Bible-shredding preachers on their own terms, for the scriptural emphasis on correct doctrine and morals gives the right plenty of ammunition. After all, the Bible depicts Jesus as driving the moneychangers out of the temple, not facilitating a group encounter weekend for them.

I understand Spong's ideas aren't really his but simply retread 19th-century scepticism.