Monday, October 24, 2005

anne rice

After 25 novels in 25 years, Rice, 64, hasn’t published a book since 2003’s “Blood Chronicle,” the tenth volume of her best-selling vampire series. They may have heard she came close to death last year, when she had surgery for an intestinal blockage, and also back in 1998, when she went into a sudden diabetic coma; that same year she returned to the Roman Catholic Church, which she’d left at 18. They surely knew that Stan Rice, her husband of 41 years, died of a brain tumor in 2002. And though she’d moved out of their longtime home in New Orleans more than a year before Hurricane Katrina, she still has property there—and the deep emotional connection that led her to make the city the setting for such novels as “Interview With the Vampire.” What’s up with her? “For the last six months,” she says, “people have been sending e-mails saying, ‘What are you doing next?’ And I’ve told them, ‘You may not want what I’m doing next’.” We’ll know soon. In two weeks, Anne Rice, the chronicler of vampires, witches and—under the pseudonym A. N. Roquelaure—of soft-core S&M encounters, will publish “Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt,” a novel about the 7-year-old Jesus, narrated by Christ himself. “I promised,” she says, “that from now on I would write only for the Lord.” It’s the most startling public turnaround since Bob Dylan’s “Slow Train Coming” announced that he’d been born again.

Read the whole thing here. Pretty amazing.

1 comment:

J-Tron said...

Having read almost everything she's written, both before and after her reversion, I suspect that her version of Christ's life will not be particularly wedded to orthodoxy. I do nevertheless greatly anticipate reading this novel as I think Anne Rice is the finest novelist of our era, regardless of the press she gets.